BUSINESS

BUSINESS

Tuesday, September 15, 2015

SOMEWHERE IN TIME

 

 

 

 

 
SOMEWHERE IN TIME

Lady Clementina Hawarden is rated as one of the most influential Victorian fine art photographers, blazing the way for women in the profession when it was dominated by men

Age of innocence: Beautiful homespun images capture early 20th century 'wonder years' These fascinating pictures of American and Canadian youngsters in the first half of the 20th century capture an almost forgotten age of innocence and the simplest of pleasures. The photographs, from the archives of the National Geographic magazine, show children from around two or three up until their early teens and give a fascinating glimpse into what life was like for youngsters without the all trappings of the modern world which we now take so much for granted. The children are pictured huddled together in the family homestead or talking a jolly stroll in the countryside. Two young boys are seen staring in awe at a billboard announcing the circus is in town wondering if they will be lucky enough to go along.

Family ties: Seven siblings sit on a wooden fence Quebec, Canada in one of the images released by National Geographic

Family ties: Seven siblings sit on a wooden fence Quebec, Canada, in one of the images released by National Geographic. The picture is believed to date from the 1930s

Four boys bob for apples in West Virginia, USA in January 1939

Four boys bob for apples in West Virginia, USA in January 1939

Arm in arm: Young children hold on to one another as they walk down a dirt road alongside a corn field in Pennsylvania, USA, in 1919

Arm in arm: Young children hold on to one another as they walk down a dirt road alongside a corn field in Pennsylvania, USA, in 1919

Another shot, dating from 1936, shows four boys enjoying a game of apple bobbing - well this was a time when an xbox was some sort of mystery package and social networking meant a chat with your neighbour over a rickety wooden fence.

But the smiling faces and apparent joy betray the grim reality for many youngsters who lived during this era - a time of catastrophic world war, massive social change and incredible technological development. For hundreds of thousands of children life was incredibly tough - instead of an education they would be forced to work from an early age fuelling the nation's Industrial revolution.

Others would spend long hours toiling in the fields of family farms or working in factories. Children as young as five would be recruited as messengers, newsboys, peddlers and in various other menial jobs.

Employers seized on Children who they regarded as cheap labor - their small size meant they were capable of wriggling into through narrow parts of mechanical machines where adults could not go.

Incredibly it took until the Great Depression to end child labor, for adults had become so desperate for jobs that they would work for the same wage as children and in 1938, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the Fair Labor Standards Act, which finally placed limits on child labor.

Four Amish children perch on a fence on a hot summer's day in Pennsylvania in 1941

Four Amish children perch on a fence on a hot summer's day in Pennsylvania in 1941

The circus is in town: Two small boys gaze at a circus billboard in rural Ohio in an early colour picture from 1932

The circus is in town: Two small boys gaze at a circus billboard in rural Ohio in an early colour picture from 1932

 

A boy shows off his freshly picked strawberries in Missouri, USA, in 1943 Two children with a puppy sit on an old split rail fence in Missouri in 1946  

 

 

A boy shows off his freshly picked strawberries in Missouri  in 1943, while two children with a puppy sit on an old split rail fence in Missouri in 1946

Morning glory: Mother carries milk pails on her shoulders while the children lead a horse on a foggy morning walk in Quebec, Canada in 1950

Morning glory: Mother carries milk pails on her shoulders while the children lead a horse on a foggy morning walk in Quebec, Canada in 1950


The beauty and opulence of the 1940s and '50s

These glorious fashion photographs from the 1940s and 1950s hark back to a bygone era before photoshop, when models looked like real women.

They are the work of legendary photographer Gordon Parks, who throughout his long career was a man of many firsts including the first African-American staff photographer for Life magazine and later the first African-American to direct a major motion picture.

Parks first gained his reputation with a camera for stunning fashion shoots such as these. From the beginning, he challenged prevailing rules about how to photograph fashion, including objects, group poses and streetscapes that were selling not just clothing but a lifestyle too for emerging independent woman.

Park's fashion photographs hark back to an era long before photoshop when the models looked like real women

Parks' fashion photographs hark back to an era long before photoshop when the models looked like real women

Parks challenged prevailing rules about how to photograph fashion

Parks challenged prevailing rules about how to photograph fashion

He devised both dramatic and subtle poses for the models, who wore suits, dresses, coats and hats from new collections. He placed them in the studio and on location in Chicago, Paris and New York, using realistic scenes and the city as backdrops.

His photographs suggested that he caught his subjects off guard and midaction, as if they were waiting for a bus, in the middle of a shopping trip or expecting a lunch date. Parks captured these casual moments with a sense of intimacy and awareness. The viewer imagined the moment, which was framed dramatically, as if part of a narrative. The models’ poses, though subtle, provoke ideas about desire and the idealized body.

Parks’s importance to fashion photography is now beyond question. He challenged the genre by inventing ways to enrich our ideas about style.

The Flatiron Building in New York is the backdrop to this image of a woman and her four suitors

The Flatiron Building in New York is the backdrop to this image of a woman and her four suitors

Parks fashion photographs are about the experience of being dressed

Parks' fashion photographs are about the experience of being dressed

Born into abject poverty in Kansas in 1912, Parks was sent to live with family in Saint Paul, Minn. when he was 14 after his mom died. Soon after he found himself turned out on to the streets.

Parks worked odd jobs to get by until 1938, he was inspired to take up photography after seeing images in a discarded magazine.

He bought his first camera at a pawn shop, and within months his pictures were being exhibited in Minneapolis. Success as a photographer quickly blossomed from there.

Vogue was among the magazines he read closely after passengers left copies behind in the rail cars along the route between Chicago and Seattle. Those magazines guided him as he taught himself to make photographs that engaged a wide variety of people.

With a clear understanding about how to ‘look’ on city streets, in cafes and society balls, Parks’s fashion photographs are about the experience of being dressed.

Parks, who passed away in 2006, is widely recognized as the most important and influential African-American photographer of the twentieth century

Parks, who passed away in 2006, is widely recognized as the most important and influential African-American photographer of the twentieth century

Parks taught himself to make photographs that engaged a wide variety of peopleBlending in: A simple solution to cancel out the mother in this photo has been to hide her face behind the wall hanging

Parks taught himself to make photographs that engaged a wide variety of people

Parks captures casual moments with a sense of intimacy and awareness

Parks captures casual moments with a sense of intimacy and awareness

He communicated beauty, vanity and pleasure in his photographs of fashionably dressed women, which began with his first assignment in St. Paul at Frank Murphy’s Women’s Clothing Store.

His first wife, Sally, who was a designer and often modeled for him, also may have inspired his interest in fashion.

As well as fashion, Parks' photographs also pursued his passion for documenting the lives of African Americans.

Parks’ talent eventually led him to New York City, where, despite the racial prejudice of the time, he was hired by Vogue’s Alexander Liberman to shoot a collection of evening gowns.

He continued to freelance for Vogue for several years, developing a unique style that was realistic, romantic and full of movement.

Parks¿ photographs perfectly encapsulates the beauty and opulence of the 1940s and ¿50s elite

Parks' photographs perfectly encapsulate the beauty and opulence of the 1940s and '50s elite

Parks developed a unique style that was realistic, romantic and full of movement

Parks developed a unique style that was realistic, romantic and full of movement

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Michigan island stuck in a charming time warp

An Island in Michigan has kept Victorian-era charm thanks to its ban on motor vehicles and has become a huge tourist draw for its quaint ways.

Motor vehicles have been banned on the island since the start of the 20th century after an automobile frightened some of the horses. These days, people still travel by horse-drawn carriage, as well as by bike and by foot.

Scroll down for video tour

Mackinac Island

Stuck in the past: Mackinac Island is a Great Lakes enclave that retains its Victorian-era charm thanks to its ban on motor vehicles

Stuck in time: Mackinac Island, a Great Lakes enclave, retains its Victorian-era charm thanks to its ban on motor vehicles

Stuck in time: Mackinac Island, a Great Lakes enclave, retains its Victorian-era charm thanks to its ban on motor vehicles

Mackinac Island

Mackinac Island, located off the Straits of Mackinac separating Michigan's Upper and Lower Peninsulas, was an important outpost in the region's fur trade, but that gave way to fishing and eventually tourism

Mackinac Island, located off the Straits of Mackinac separating Michigan's Upper and Lower Peninsulas, was an important outpost in the region's fur trade, but that gave way to fishing and eventually tourism.

Among the main attractions: the Grand Hotel, a 385-room luxury hotel that played a central role in the 1980 romantic science fiction film, Somewhere in Time.

In fact, fans of the movie, many in period costumes, descend on the island and the hotel every fall for a weekend of reenactments and a screening.

You get reminders of a bygone era before even leaving the mainland by ferry. Crews cart overnight luggage onto the ferry, the way full-service porters used to at train stations and hotels.

Back in time: Motor vehicles have been banned on the island since the start of the 20th century; these days, people still travel by horse-drawn carriage, as well as by bike and by foot

Back in time: Motor vehicles have been banned on the island since the start of the 20th century; these days, people still travel by horse-drawn carriage, as well as by bike and by foot

Horse-drawn vehicle on Mackinac Island, Mich., in Lake Huron. Motor vehicles are not allowed on the island, so bikes and horse carriages are common sights. (AP Photo/Anick Jesdanun)

Alternate transport: Despite the lack of motor vehicles, Mackinac Island has a 'highway' which you can walk or run; you can also rent bikes

Mackinac Island

About 80per cent of the island is controlled by the state park, but staff there can also point you to other things to do, too

Ferry only: Round Island Lighthouse, which dates to the 1890s but is no longer a functioning lighthouse once marked the channel between Round Island and Mackinac

Ferry only: Round Island Lighthouse, which dates to the 1890s but is no longer a functioning lighthouse once marked the channel between Round Island and Mackinac

The Grand Hotel stands out as your ferry approaches the island. Closer to the dock, you pass a pair of quaint lighthouses, including one featured in the movie.

The Grand Hotel is such a draw among tourists that non-guests must pay a $10 admission fee. That allows you to shop, dine or browse an art gallery inside and lets you walk through the flower gardens in front of the hotel.

Check out the Cupola Bar on the top floor for a wonderful view of the Straits of Mackinac. There's a dress code in the evening, so plan accordingly.

Once you're on the island, you have plenty of options. Head to the Mackinac Island State Park Visitor's Center for an orientation. About 80per cent of the island is controlled by the state park, but staff there can also point you to other things to do, too.

Historical: Mackinac Island was the second national park created after Yellowstone. But with the closure of Fort Mackinac, the park didn't have caretakers in the form of U.S. soldiers; the state took it over in 1895

Historical: Mackinac Island was the second national park created after Yellowstone. But with the closure of Fort Mackinac, the park didn't have caretakers in the form of U.S. soldiers; the state took it over in 1895

Waterfront: Mackinac Island is located in the Straits of Mackinac on Lake Huron and is home to many permanent residents

Waterfront: Mackinac Island is located in the Straits of Mackinac on Lake Huron and is home to many permanent residents

Isolated: An aerial view of Mackinac Island in the Straits of Mackinac, located between Lakes Michigan and Huron

Isolated: An aerial view of Mackinac Island in the Straits of Mackinac, located between Lakes Michigan and Huron

Main attraction: The Grand Hotel stands out as your ferry approaches the island. Closer to the dock, you pass a pair of quaint lighthouses

Main attraction: The Grand Hotel stands out as your ferry approaches the island. Closer to the dock, you pass a pair of quaint lighthouses

Native Americans were the first settlers on the island - Europeans missionaries came to the area in the 1670s, followed by fur traders.

The British moved operations from the mainland to the island in 1780 as protection from Americans in revolt.

So important was the outpost that the British didn't cede the island until 1796, well after Americans won the Revolutionary War. The British got Mackinac Island back briefly after a surprise attack at the start of the War of 1812.

Through those years, the island's military center was Fort Mackinac, built on top of a hill a short walk from the main village.

Mackinac Island

So important was the outpost that the British didn't cede the island until 1796, well after Americans won the Revolutionary War

Old world: Fort Mackinac located on the island since 1780 was such an important military outpost for the Great Lakes region that the British retained control of it until 1796, well after the Americans had won the Revolutionary War

Old world: Fort Mackinac located on the island since 1780 was such an important military outpost for the region that the British retained control of it until 1796, well after the Americans won the Revolutionary War

Delivery service: Roy Bessel of the Mackinac Service Company loads U.S. Mail onto a horse-drawn wagon to deliver into town

Delivery service: Roy Bessel of the Mackinac Service Company loads U.S. Mail onto a horse-drawn wagon to deliver into town

Snow-covered: Mackinac Island's Trinity (Episcopal) Church can be seen on the left in the middle of winter

Snow-covered: Mackinac Island's Trinity (Episcopal) Church can be seen on the left in the middle of winter

Summer view: Trinity Episcopal Church, built in 1882, near Fort Mackinac, seen in the summertime

Summer view: Trinity Episcopal Church, built in 1882, near Fort Mackinac, seen in the summertime

For $11, visitors can stroll through Fort Mackinac. You can witness demonstrations of old-style guns and a cannon – be sure to heed the demonstrators' advice to cover your ears. You can also see some of the buildings once used for distributing supplies, housing soldiers and more.

During the summer months, the admission also gets you into historic buildings in the main village, including a blacksmith shop and the former site of American Fur Co.

Despite the lack of motor vehicles, Mackinac Island has a state highway, running some eight miles around the island. You can walk or run it – consider the Mackinac Island Eight-Mile Road Race in September. You can also rent bikes.

If eight miles is too much, there are shorter hikes you can take, including ones to natural stone formations such as Arch Rock and Sugar Loaf. There are more than 60 miles of trails to choose from throughout the 1,800-acre state park.

High profile: In 1987 Al Gore and his wife, Tipper, leave the Grand Hotel in a horse and carriage taxi after the Democratic Governor's Association meeting on the Island

High profile: In 1987 Al Gore and his wife, Tipper, leave the Grand Hotel in a horse and carriage taxi after the Democratic Governor's Association meeting on the Island

Pictures of the past: In the late 19th century, horse-drawn carriages file past Main Street storefronts on Mackinac Island in Michigan

Pictures of the past: In the late 19th century, horse-drawn carriages file past Main Street storefronts on Mackinac Island in Michigan

A century later: Tourists and residents on the unique Mackinac Island get around on bicycle or by foot

A century later: Tourists and residents on the unique Mackinac Island get around on bicycle or by foot

Mackinac Island

Despite the lack of motor vehicles, Mackinac Island has a state highway, running some eight miles around the island. You can walk or run it ¿ consider the Mackinac Island Eight-Mile Road Race in September. You can also rent bikes

In fact, Mackinac was the second national park created after Yellowstone. But with the closure of Fort Mackinac, the park didn't have caretakers in the form of U.S. soldiers. The state took it over in 1895.

It's free to walk along the streets downtown, where you'll find shops, churches, museums and other buildings. You'll also see lots of horses and carriages in lieu of cars.

If you want to ride one, several companies offer tours and taxi service. Tours cost $24.50 and last nearly two hours. You can get off and get on as many times as you like, so you can use it as a bus service to get around. Expect to pay $100 or more an hour for private taxi service. You can also rent horses to ride yourself.

Mackinac Island is about 300 miles north of Detroit. Interstate 75 will get you to the Straits of Mackinac in about four and a half hours. Ferries leave several times a day from Mackinaw City in the Lower Peninsula and St. Ignace in the Upper Peninsula. Tickets cost about $25, though you can save money by buying online or finding a coupon at your hotel.

Natural: The island offers Victorian charm in modern times, with a century-long ban on motor vehicles, but visitors can hike or bike to Arch Rock and other attractions

Natural: The island offers Victorian charm in modern times, with a century-long ban on motor vehicles, but visitors can hike or bike to Arch Rock and other attractions

Mackinac Island

During the summer months, the admission also gets you into historic buildings in the main village, including a blacksmith shop and the former site of American Fur Co

Well-dressed: A sign highlights the dress code at the  385-room luxury Grand Hotel on Mackinac Island

Well-dressed: A sign highlights the dress code at the 385-room luxury Grand Hotel on Mackinac Island

You can also fly there. Delta offers service to Pellston, Michigan, from Detroit, while Lakeshore Express flies from both Detroit and Chicago.

From Pellston, you can take a cab or shuttle to the ferry, or take a charter flight to a smaller airport on the island.

As for accommodations, you can splurge for a room at the Grand Hotel or find several cheaper options on the island. The mainland has far more economical lodging, not far from the ferry terminals.

Whether you're at Mackinac Island for just the day or with an overnight stay, be sure to stop by one of the many shops selling fudge – the island's specialty cuisine. Just leave your diet on the mainland.

 

 

In the Disney classic 101 Dalmatians, the dogs play a major role in the love story. And so two dog-loving fans of the movie decided it would provide the perfect inspiration for their engagement photoshoot, which saw them rope in their pet pooches to recreate one of the most iconic scenes from the animated classic. 

Singers Tony Collier, 26, and Corinne Jones, 25, who counts the movie as one of the favorites, met in 2009 at the University of Illinois while dancing at a formal and now live in Napierville, Cosmopolitan.com reports.

And when it came to deciding how to celebrate their recent engagement, the couple couldn't think of a better way to capture their love story than with a 101 Dalmatians-themed shoot that would even allow them to get their pet dogs involved.

Dog days: Tony Collier, 26, and Corinne Jones, 25, decided to re-create scenes from 101 Dalmatians for their engagement photo shoot

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Dog days: Tony Collier, 26, and Corinne Jones, 25, decided to re-create scenes from 101 Dalmatians for their engagement photo shoot

Movie magic: In the Disney film, central characters Roger and Anita's romance begins when his dalmatian Pongo ties them together

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Movie magic: In the Disney film, central characters Roger and Anita's romance begins when his dalmatian Pongo ties them together

The couple opted to step into the lead roles of animated characters Roger and Anita, and reenact the moment in the movie when the two - and their dogs - meet for the first time, after being forced together by their pet Dalmatians.  

Tony and Corinne created the scene from the future bride's favorite film, using their dogs, Mookie and Izabella, in place of Roger and Anita's dogs, Pongo and Perdita.

'My future wife's favorite movie is 101 Dalmatians, and for our engagement photos she asked if we could recreate this one iconic scene (using our respective family dogs of course, Mookie & Izabelle),' Tony explained on the original Imgur post, before adding: 'How could I resist?

And so they found the perfect spot - right next to a lake - and set about perfecting their 101 Dalmatians-inspired poses, wrapping their dog's leads around one another, making funny faces and even toppling over into the water, just like in the movie. 

Film fan: The couple used their dogs Mookie and Izabella in place of the dalmatians 

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Film fan: The couple used their dogs Mookie and Izabella in place of the dalmatians

Their story: Tony and Corinne are both from Chicago, Illinois but now live in Napierville 

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Their story: Tony and Corinne are both from Chicago, Illinois but now live in Napierville

Lit love: Corinne and her fiance both worked at Walt Disney World after graduation 

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Lit love: Corinne and her fiance both worked at Walt Disney World after graduation

Reading it: In the movie, Anita sits on a park bench to read 

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Reading it: In the movie, Anita sits on a park bench to read

The couple even ensured that they had near-identical outfits so that the final photos would look as close to the movie scenes as possible, with the exception of their own dogs, who don't quite have the same stand-out spots as the movie's four-legged stars.

Unsurprisingly, once the photos were posted on Imgur, they immediately went viral and have racked up hundreds of comments so far.

After graduation, Tony and Corinne both went to work at Walt Disney World - and they now teach music and special education at middle and high school levels.

The engagement photos were taken by Melissa Biggerstaff, and they told Cosmopolitan.com that their popularity came as a big surprise to everyone. Tony and Corinne have set a wedding date in June 2016 and plan to tie the knot in Aurora, Illinois.

Iconic scene: Tony gazes into the distance with his dog 

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Iconic scene: Tony gazes into the distance with his dog

Movie moment: In another scene, Roger and Pongo relax by the water 

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Movie moment: In another scene, Roger and Pongo relax by the water

Splash! The couple even recreated the moment when the characters ended up toppling over into the lake, getting totally drenched in the process 

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Splash! The couple even recreated the moment when the characters ended up toppling over into the lake, getting totally drenched in the process

All wet: In the movie, Roger and Anita got soaked 

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All wet: In the movie, Roger and Anita got soaked

 

Oh dear: Luckily the newly-engaged couple seem to find some humor in the moment - unlike the original movie characters Oh dear: Luckily the newly-engaged couple seem to find some humor in the moment - unlike the original movie characters

Oh dear: Luckily the newly-engaged couple seem to find some humor in the moment - unlike the original movie characters

To the rescue: Tony and Corinne put their own twist on the moment when Roger rings out his handkerchief 

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To the rescue: Tony and Corinne put their own twist on the moment when Roger rings out his handkerchief

Helping out: In the movie, the tension is finally broken when the couple crack up over their sopping wet handkerchiefs 

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Helping out: In the movie, the tension is finally broken when the couple crack up over their sopping wet handkerchiefs

Tied up: Corinne is tied up by the couple's dog, who pays a key role in the photo shoot 

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Tied up: Corinne is tied up by the couple's dog, who pays a key role in the photo shoot

Animated scene: Pongo the dog is definitely the star of the show 

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Animated scene: Pongo the dog is definitely the star of the show

Relaxed setting: Corinne is engrossed in her book with her dog at her side 

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Relaxed setting: Corinne is engrossed in her book with her dog at her side

Quiet moment: Anita and her dalmatian enjoy a moment of meditation before falling into the water 

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Quiet moment: Anita and her dalmatian enjoy a moment of meditation before falling into the water

 

 

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