BUSINESS

BUSINESS

Tuesday, November 24, 2015

TURKEY SHOOTS DOWN RUSSIAN JET

 

 

 

   

Vladimir Putin warns Turkey there will be ‘consequences’ over downed Russian jet

The Russian Sukhoi Su-24 jet was shot down by Turkish F-16 fighter planes on Tuesday morning after violating the country's air space and ignoring 'ten warnings in the space of five minutes', army officials said. However, Russia's Ministry of Defence claims the jet was in Syrian airspace, and was shot down from the ground. Footage reportedly filmed by rebels in Syria's Turkomen Mountains, an area which has been the cause of recent tensions between Turkey and Russia, shows local fighters cheer as they uncover the body of one of the Russian pilots. The men can be seen surrounding the corpse of the pilot, wearing Russian military fatigues, shouting 'Allahu Akbar' - 'God is great'. The area is mainly populated by Turkmens - Syrians citizens, but ethnic Turks - and it has been the target of a Syrian government offensive over the past week, where President Bashar al-Assad's ground troops have been supported by Russian airstrikes. Both pilots ejected themselves from the jet and could be seen parachuting down to the ground, where one has been reported as captured by Syrian Turkmen rebels who are hunting for the second pilot.

   
   

Putin warns Turkey there will be 'serious consequences' for 'stabbing Russia in the back' by shooting down one of its jets… as video emerges of rebels chanting 'Allahu Akbar' over the body of dead pilot

  • Turkish army has shot down a Russian Sukhoi Su-24 war plane near its Syrian border, officials confirm
  • The Russian jet had violated Turkish air space and ignored ten warnings in five minutes, army says
  • Putin called Turkey's decision to shoot down the plane a 'stab in the back by the terrorists' accomplices'
  • Russia claims the jet, which crashed in Syria's Turkomen Mountains, had been in Syrian airspace when it was hit
  • In response, Turkish army released flight tracking data showing where the jet violated its airspace
  • One pilot dead, the other reportedly captured by Turkmen - ethnic Turks subjected to Russian airstrikes this week

President Vladimir Putin has accused Turkey of funding ISIS, and using its military to protect the terrorist organisation, after a Russian fighter jet was shot down near the Syrian border on Tuesday morning.

The two-pilot Sukhoi Su-24 jet was shot down by F-16 fighter planes just after 9am this morning, after it violated Turkish airspace and ignored nearly a dozen warnings by the military, Ankara officials said.

President Putin called Turkey's decision to down the plane a 'stab in the back' by the accomplices of ISIS, as his Defence Ministry still claims the jet was flying over Syria and never entered Turkish airspace.

 

This image shows the moment the Russian Sukhoi Su-24 jet was shot down by Turkish F-16 fighter planes near the Turkish-Syrian border, in Hatay, which has seen NATO call an 'extraordinary' meeting and Russian President Putin warn of 'serious consequences' 

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This image shows the moment the Russian Sukhoi Su-24 jet was shot down by Turkish F-16 fighter planes near the Turkish-Syrian border, in Hatay, which has seen NATO call an 'extraordinary' meeting and Russian President Putin warn of 'serious consequences'

Conflicting stories: Turkey claims they shot the plane down as it was violating the country's airspace after the pilots ignored 'ten warnings in the space of five minutes', but Russia says the jet was in Syrian airspace 

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Conflicting stories: Turkey claims they shot the plane down as it was violating the country's airspace after the pilots ignored 'ten warnings in the space of five minutes', but Russia says the jet was in Syrian airspace

 

'Proof'? This image accompanied by a video claims to show one of the Russian pilots found dead by Turkmen rebels

 

'Proof'? This image, left, accompanied by a video, right, claims to show one of the Russian pilots found dead by Turkmen rebels

'The loss we suffered today came from a stab in the back delivered by accomplices of the terrorists,' President Putin said, speaking at a meeting with King Abdullah II of Jordan in Sochi, Russia, on Thursday afternoon.

'We will never tolerate such atrocities as happened today and we hope that the international community will find the strength to join forces and fight this evil,' Putin said.

The president warned that 'today's tragic event will have serious consequences for Russian-Turkish relations', shortly before Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov cancelled tomorrow's visit to Turkey, where the two nations were due to discuss Syria.

Putin boldly claimed that Turkey has been buying oil from ISIS, funding the terrorist group, and accused Ankara of protecting the jihadists with the country's military, Moscow-funded RT.com reports.

The Russian president's warning came as Syrian insurgents reportedly shot down rescue helicopter as it was searching for the pilots from the downed warplane.

An insurgent group in Syria's Latakia province hit the helicopter with an anti-tank missile, forcing it to make an emergency landing, according to the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights.

 

 

Russian President Vladimir Putin called Turkey's decision to down the plane a 'stab in the back by the accomplices of terrorists'

Flight: This map shows the route of the Russian jet (shown in red), based on data released by the Turkish government, including where it violated Turkish airspace, and the area in the Turkomen Mountains where it crashed

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Flight: This map shows the route of the Russian jet (shown in red), based on data released by the Turkish government, including where it violated Turkish airspace, and the area in the Turkomen Mountains where it crashed

Footage reportedly filmed by rebels in Syria's Turkomen Mountains, an area which has been the cause of recent tensions between Turkey and Russia, emerged showing local fighters cheer as they discover the body of one of the Russian pilots.

The video, posted on Twitter by a man believed to be a Syrian-Turkmen rebel soldier, shows at least a dozen men surrounding the corpse of the pilot, dressed in Russian military fatigues, and some are heard shouting 'Allahu Akbar' – 'God is great'.

Local rebels said the pilot, who can be seen covered in bruises and burns in the video, was already deceased when he landed, and that none of the Russian pilots had been killed by Syrian fighters.

The area is mainly populated by Turkmens - Syrians citizens, but ethnic Turks - and is the target of a current Syrian government offensive, where President Bashar al-Assad's ground troops are supported by Russian airstrikes.

The Turkish army said the pilots of the Russian jet had been warned 'ten times in the space of five minutes' before the plane was shot down.

Both pilots ejected themselves from the jet and could be seen parachuting down to the ground, where one has been reported dead and the other captured by Syrian Turkmen rebels. 

The Turkomen Mountains is controlled by several insurgent groups, who are not allied with ISIS, including al-Qaida's branch in Syria, the Nusra Front, and the 2nd Coastal Division that consists of local Turkmen fighters.

 

 

Footage reportedly filmed in Syria's Turkomen Mountains shows local fighters cheer as they discover the body of one of the Russian pilots

 

At least a dozen men surround the corpse of the pilot, dressed in Russian military fatigues, and some are heard shouting 'Allahu Akbar'

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Hit: Video footage shows the plane coming down engulfed in flames after being shot by Turkish fighter jets

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Filmed: The incident was caught on camera and has been broadcast on Turkish local TV and online

Just hours before the Russian jet was shot down, Ankara called for a U.N Security Council meeting to discuss attacks on Turkmen areas in Syria, which have forced some 1,700 civilians to flee their homes in the last three days, according to Turkish officials.

It followed a summoning of Moscow's ambassador on Friday, when Ankara demanded an immediate end to the Russian military operation near the Syrian border saying the Russian actions did not 'constitute a fight against terrorism' but the bombing of civilians.

Ambassador Andrey Karlov was warned during the meeting that the Russian operations could lead to serious consequences, the ministry said.  

Turkish officials said the Russian plane was first warned that it was within ten miles of the Turkish border, and the aircraft then crossed over Turkish territory, adding that a second plane had also approached the border and been warned.

'The data we have is very clear. There were two planes approaching our border, we warned them as they were getting too close,' a senior Turkish official said.

'We warned them to avoid entering Turkish airspace before they did, and we warned them many times. Our findings show clearly that Turkish airspace was violated multiple times. And they violated it knowingly,' the official said.

NATO allies will hold an 'extraordinary' meeting later today at Ankara's request to discuss Tuesday morning's incident, an alliance official said.

'At the request of Turkey, the North Atlantic Council will hold an extraordinary meeting at 4pm. The aim of this extraordinary NAC is for Turkey to inform Allies about the downing of a Russian airplane,' the official said.

The North Atlantic Council consists of ambassadors from the 28 NATO member states.

 

 

 

One of the pilots can be seen parachuting down after ejecting from the plane, as the wreckage burns

This image released by the Turkish Army reportedly shows the flight radar tracking the movement of the downed Russian Sukhoi Su-24 jet, showing where it entered Turkish air space and where it went down

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This image released by the Turkish Army reportedly shows the flight radar tracking the movement of the downed Russian Sukhoi Su-24 jet, showing where it entered Turkish air space and where it went down

A Turkish military statement, issued before it was confirmed that the jet was Russian, said the plane entered Turkish airspace over the town of Yayladagi, in Hatay province.

'On Nov. 24, 2015 at around 09.20am, a plane whose nationality is not known violated the Turkish airspace despite several warnings (ten times within five minutes) in the area of Yayladagi, Hatary.

'Two F-16 planes on aerial patrol duty in the area intervened against the plane in question in accordance with the rules of engagement at 09.24am.'

The Turkish Army later released a radar analysis image which they say tracks the movement of the Russian Sukhoi Su-24 jet, showing where it entered Turkish air space, and where it went down.

'This isn't an action against any specific country. Our F-16s took the necessary steps to defend Turkey's sovereign territory,' a Turkish official told news agencies on condition of anonymity.

Russia's Defence Ministry said in a statement that they are looking into the circumstances of the crash of the Russian jet.

'The Ministry of Defence would like to stress that the plane was over the Syrian territory throughout the flight.'

The statement also claimed that the Sukhoi-24 had been shot down from the ground at the altitude of 6,000metres(3.73m).

DOWNING OF RUSSIAN JET ADDS TO 'TOXIC COCKTAIL' IN THE REGION, EXPERTS SAY

Turkey shooting down a Russian jet on Tuesday morning is just proof of the 'toxic cocktail' of dangers in the region which could erupt into crisis with devastating effect, an expert has warned.

Middle East expert Shashank Joshi, from the Royal United Services Institute, said the skies over Syria and Turkey are an 'incredibly crowded airspace', with planes from both nations and members of the US-led coalition against IS - including the UK - operating.

Turkey, a Nato member, has already complained about Russian incursions into its skies and last month the alliance condemned the 'unacceptable violations of Turkish airspace by Russian combat aircraft'.

Mr Joshi said: 'The situation is dangerous because Russia is quite probably deliberately probing Turkish airspace both for military reasons and political reasons.'

The Russians will be testing the military responses of the Nato member, but also carrying out the same 'psychological intimidation' tactics used in the Baltic and North Atlantic, he suggested.

The combination of the crowded airspace, Russian probing tactics and the diplomatic tensions create a 'real toxic cocktail that can easily erupt into crisis', he warned.

Ankara will be 'furious' at the incursion and Russia can expect Nato to strike a 'tough' note, but behind the scenes there will be intense diplomatic efforts to calm tensions.

But if Moscow responds in a provocative way, there is a risk of the crisis escalating.

Mr Joshi warned: 'These things always proceed in a very unpredictable fashion. We have seen how conflicts can begin when there are large alliances.'

Ejected: The two pilots of the Russian Sukhoi-24 jet can be seen parachuting down after the plane was hit

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Ejected: The two pilots of the Russian Sukhoi-24 jet can be seen parachuting down after the plane was hit

 Russia's Ministry of Defence claims the jet was in Syrian airspace, and was shot down from the ground

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Russia's Ministry of Defence claims the jet was in Syrian airspace, and was shot down from the ground

Vladimir Putin's spokesman called the downing of the Su-24 warplane a 'very serious incident' but declined to comment further until more facts emerged.

'It is just impossible to say something without having full information,' said Dmitry Peskov.

Russia's government-run TV Zvezda claimed the warplane had been in Syrian airspace the entire time, which allegedly could be proven by 'control systems', a ministry spokesman said.

'It's the kind of thing we're been warning about,' said Ian Kearns, director of the European Leadership Network think-tank in London.

'And it's a direct military engagement between a NATO country and Russia, so I think it's a serious incident in anybody's book.'

Turkish Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoglu has spoken with the chief of military staff and the foreign minister about the developments on the Syrian border, the prime minister's office said in a statement, without mentioning the downed jet.

He has ordered the foreign ministry to consult with NATO, the United Nations and related countries on the latest developments, his office said.

Last month, Turkish jets shot down an unidentified drone that had also violated Turkey's airspace.  

Turkey and Russia have long been at loggerheads over the Syrian conflict, with Ankara seeking Assad's overthrow while Moscow does everything to keep him in power. 

Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov is due to visit Turkey on Wednesday to discuss Syria, in a trip arranged before this incident.Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan is meanwhile expected to visit Russia for talks with Putin in late December.

Russia's participation in the Syrian peace process talks in Vienna, the co-operation on the UN Security Council resolution and meetings between Russian President Vladimir Putin and Nato leaders provided signs of a renewed diplomatic engagement between Moscow and the West in recent weeks.

French President Francois Hollande will meet Mr Putin on Thursday and Russia has offered co-operation in the fight against IS following the atrocities in Paris and the downing of a Russian passenger jet in Egypt.

Russian pilots operating out of the Latakia air base in Syria have a small escape kit to help them on the ground if they are forced to eject from their jet.

In the Sukhoi Su-24 Fencer, the escape kit is located in a small compartment underneath the ejector seat.

The escape kit contains an inflatable raft, in case the aircraft is brought down over water. There is also a radio beacon which will relay the pilot's location to any potential rescue aircraft.

The pilot also has a radio, signal flares, a machete and a knife. It is likely the pilot will have a sidearm to defend himself. 

Russian pilots are equipped with a small escape kit in a compartment underneath their ejector seat 

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Russian pilots are equipped with a small escape kit in a compartment underneath their ejector seat

Among the basic equipment in the escape kit is a machette, pictured, and a small supply of water

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Among the basic equipment in the escape kit is a machette, pictured, and a small supply of water

 

 

Moscow to Deploy the Most Advanced Missile Defense System to Syria:

Moscow to deploy S-400 defense missile system to Khmeimim airbase in Syria

An S-400 "Triumf" antiaircraft missile system. © Kirill Kallinikov

An S-400 “Triumf” antiaircraft missile system.

The Russian Air Force base in Latakia will be reinforced with S-400 SAM system, which will soon be deployed there, Russia’s Defense Minister Sergey Shoigu said on Wednesday.

“S-400 will be deployed on Khmeimim airbase in Syria,” Shoigu said at a Defense Ministry meeting.

Earlier on Tuesday, the Russian Su-24 was shot down by a Turkish F-16 fighter jet near the Turkish-Syrian border. One pilot died in the incident. The second one was rescued and brought to the Russian airbase in Latakia.

Moscow maintains the jet did not violate Turkey’s airspace. It ditched on Syria’s territory four kilometers from the border.

Russian Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev. © Ekaterina Shtukina

Ankara defends ISIS, Turkish officials have financial interest in oil trade with group – PM Medvedev

Shortly afterwards, the MoD announced three steps to be taken following the attack on the Russian Su-24 bomber, including providing aerial cover by fighter jets for every airstrike, boosting air defense by deploying guided missile cruisers off the Latakia coast, and suspending all military-to-military contacts with Turkey.

The S-400 is Russia’s most advanced anti-aircraft defense system. It is as an upgrade of the S-300 Growler family, designed and developed by Almaz Antei. The S-400 is employed to ensure air defense using long- and medium-range missiles that can hit aerial targets at ranges up to 400 kilometers.

The S-400 is capable of hitting tactical and strategic aircraft as well as ballistic and cruise missiles. The system includes a set of radars, missile launchers and command posts, and is operated solely by the Russian military.

Khmeimim airbase in Latakia, Syria, accommodates Russian Air Force squadrons of Su-27SM and Su-30 fighter jets, Su-34 and Su-24 tactical bombers, which are all taking part in airstrikes on Islamic State positions. The airbase is protected by state-of-the-art air defense systems and radars. Khmeimim also has a fully operational unit for maintaining fixed- and rotor-wing aircraft and providing logistical assistance to pilots.

Moscow to Deploy the Most Advanced Missile Defense System to Syria: Defense Minister

“Nowhere to run, nowhere to hide”

in the wake of his insane decision to shoot down a Russian plane for a trivial, most likely nonexistent, border violation, Erdogan has finished tearing his own legacy to shreds. He may also have set the stage for the carving-up of Turkey, in accordance with Israel’s ongoing Oded Yinon plan to balkanize the Middle East.

Erdogan’s decision to join the war on Syria ended his “no problems with neighbors” policy with a vengeance. Today, there is no country on earth with more problems with its neighbors than Turkey. Russia is furious and planning revenge. Ditto Assad. Ditto Iran. Iraq too. And the Kurds are literally up in arms battling Erdogan’s ISIS proxies and setting the stage for the dismemberment of Turkey.

Meanwhile, the Turkish economy is sinking, Turkish society is fragmenting, and the Ergenekon heroin-smuggling neocon creeps and Grey Wolf weirdos are howling for blood.

How in the world did Erdogan blunder into this mess?

Apparently NATO’s high command informed Erdogan in 2011 that regime change in Syria was a done deal. They were going to do to Assad what they just did to Qaddafi. Nobody could stop them. Erdogan could either join the bandwagon and play the lead role running post-regime-change Syria, or he would be left behind.

Erdogan bit.

SUCKER!

It was a trap. Like Saddam Hussein, who was lured into invading Kuwait by US-ordered slant drilling, loan-calling-in, and Bush’s agent April Glaspie, Erdogan was suckered into waging a disastrous war designed to destroy not only Syria, but Turkey as well.

Had Erdogan told NATO to go stuff it, as he did in 2003, Turkey would still be enjoying near-double-digit growth, and its President would be the most popular leader in Turkish history, right up there with Suleiman the Magnificent, and far ahead of scumbag Attaturk – whose legacy he could have finished shredding.

But once again, a Middle Eastern leader believed what the imperialists told him. Like Qaddafi, who thought cooperating with the West and abandoning his WMD would  be appreciated, and like Saddam Hussein, who thought that if he only waged wars the West told him to wage he would be fine, Erdogan believed NATO when they told him, in early 2011, that he would get to run Syria very very soon, just as soon as they got rid of Assad…on the condition that he join the regime change operation.

Now Russia is going to declare covert war on Turkey. They are going to smash Turkey’s anti-Assad proxies, not just ISIS but all the others as well, into tiny pieces. And they are going to ratchet up support to the PKK, which is now in a position to achieve its decades-old aspirations for the dismemberment of Turkey and the establishment of an independent Kurdistan.

This Thanksgiving, Turkey’s total turkey of a president has set up Turkey to get stuffed, carved up, and devoured.

 

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