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BUSINESS

Saturday, November 18, 2017






AIRSHIPS THEN AND NOW: Hindenburg disaster.

The massive German airship caught fire while attempting to land near Lakehurst, New Jersey, killing 35 people aboard, plus one ground crew member. Of the 97 passengers and crew members on board, 62 managed to survive. The horrifying incident was captured by reporters and photographers and replayed on radio broadcasts, in newsprint, and on newsreels. News of the disaster led to a public loss of confidence in airship travel, ending an era. The 245 m (803 f) Hindenburg used flammable hydrogen for lift, which incinerated the airship in a massive fireball, but the actual cause of the initial fire remains unknown. Gathered here are images of the Hindenburg's first successful year of transatlantic travel, and of its tragic ending 75 years ago. (Also, be sure to see Recovered Letters Reveal the Lost History of the Hindenburg on Atlantic Video.) [34 photos]
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The German zeppelin Hindenburg flies over Manhattan on May 6, 1937. A few hours later, the ship burst into flames in an attempt to land at Lakehurst, New Jersey, (AP Photo) 

2
Finishing touches are applied to the A/S Hindenburg in the huge German construction hangar at Friedrichshafen. Workmen, dwarfed in comparison with the ship's huge tail surfaces, are chemically treating the fabric covering the huge hull.(San Diego Air & Space Museum) # 

3
The steel skeleton of "LZ 129", the new German airship, under construction in Friedrichshafen. The airship would later be named after the late Field Marshal Paul von Hindenburg, former President of Germany.(Deutsches Bundesarchiv/German Federal Archive) # 

4
The Hindenburg dumps water to ensure a smoother landing in Lakehurst, New Jersey, on May 9, 1936. The airship made 17 round trips across the Atlantic Ocean in 1936, transporting 2,600 passengers in comfort at speeds up to 135 km/h (85 mph). The Zeppelin Company began constructing the Hindenburg in 1931, several years before Adolf Hitler's appointment as German Chancellor. For the 14 months it operated, the airship flew under the newly-changed German national flag, the swastika flag of the Nazi Party. (AP Photo) # 

5
Spectators and ground crew surround the gondola of the Hindenburg as the lighter-than-air ship prepares to depart the U.S. Naval Station at Lakehurst, New Jersey, on May 11, 1936, on a return trip to Germany. (AP Photo) # 

6
A color photograph of the dining room aboard the Hindenburg. (Deutsches Bundesarchiv/German Federal Archive) # 

7
Passengers in the dining room of the Hindenburg, in April of 1936. (OFF/AFP/Getty Images) # 

8
The Hindenburg flies over the Boston Common in Boston, Massachusetts in 1936. Another small plane can also be seen at top right. (Courtesy of the Boston Public Library, Leslie Jones Collection) # 

9
A U.S. Coast Guard plane escorts the Hindenburg to a landing at Lakehurst, New Jersey, on its inaugural flight between Freidrichshafen and Lakehurst in 1936. (US Coast Guard) # 

10
The giant German zeppelin Hindenburg, in Lakehurst, New Jersey, in May of 1936. The Olympic rings on the side were promoting the 1936 Berlin Summer Olympics. (OFF/AFP/Getty Images) # 

11
The Hindenburg trundles into the U.S. Navy hangar, its nose hooked to the mobile mooring tower, at Lakehurst, New Jersey, on May 9, 1936. The rigid airship had just set a record for its first north Atlantic crossing, the first leg of ten scheduled round trips between Germany and America. (AP Photo) # 

12
The German-built zeppelin Hindenburg is shown from behind, with the Swastika symbol on its tail wing, as the dirigible is partially enclosed by its hangar at the U.S. Navy Air Station in Lakehurst, New Jersey, May 9, 1936. (AP Photo) # 

13
The Hindenburg, above ground crew at the U.S. Navy Air Station in Lakehurst, New Jersey.(Courtesy of the Boston Public Library, Leslie Jones Collection) # 

14
The Hindenburg floats past the Empire State Building over Manhattan on August 8, 1936, en route to Lakehurst, New Jersey, from Germany. (AP Photo) # 

15
A modern, electrically equipped kitchen aboard the Hindenburg provided for the passengers and crew, seen in this undated photograph. (AP Photo) # 

16
Interior of the lounge aboard the Hindenburg, where passenger windows could be opened.(Nationaal Archief/Spaarnestad Photo) # 

17
The Hindenburg floats over Manhattan Island in New York City on May 6, 1937, just hours from disaster in nearby New Jersey. (AP Photo) # 

18
The German dirigible Hindenburg, just before it crashed before landing at the U.S. Naval Station in Lakehurst, New Jersey, on May 6, 1937. (AP Photo) # 

19
At approximately 7:25 p.m. local time, the German zeppelin Hindenburg burst into flames as it nosed toward the mooring post at the Naval Air Station in Lakehurst, New Jersey, on May 6, 1937. The airship was still some 200 feet above the ground. (AP Photo/Murray Becker) # 

20
The Hindenburg quickly went up in flames -- less than a minute passed between the first signs of trouble and complete disaster. This image captures a moment between the second and third explosions before the airship hit the ground.(AP Photo) # 

21
As the lifting Hydrogen gas burned and escaped from the rear of the Hindenburg, the tail dropped to the ground, sending a burst of flame punching through the nose. Ground crew below scatter to flee the inferno. (AP Photo) # 

22
A portion of newsreel coverage as the front of the flaming Hindenburg crashes to the ground, with passengers and crew running for their lives. Full movie here. (Archive.org/Prelinger Archives/Pathé) # 

23
A survivor flees the collapsing structure of the airship Hindenburg. (Note, the hand-retouching in this photo came from the original) (AP Photo) # 

24
The wreckage of the Hindenburg in Lakehurst, New Jersey, on May 6, 1937. (AP Photo/Murray Becker) # 

25
Major Hans Hugo Witt of the German Luftwaffe, who was severely burned in the Hindenburg disaster, is seen as he is transferred from Paul Kimball Hospital in Lakewood, New Jersey, to another area hospital, on May 7, 1937. (AP Photo) # 

26
An unidentified woman survivor is led from the scene of the Hindenburg disaster at the U.S. Naval Station in Lakehurst, New Jersey, on May 6, 1937. (AP Photo/Murray Becker) # 

27
Adolf Fisher, an injured mechanic from the German airship Hindenburg, is transferred from Paul Kimball Hospital in Lakewood, New Jersey, to an ambulance going to another area hospital, on May 7, 1937. (AP Photo) # 

28
Members of the U.S. Navy Board of Inquiry inspect the wreckage of the German zeppelin Hindenburg on the field in New Jersey, on May 8, 1937. (AP Photo) # 

29
Customs officers search through baggage items salvaged in the Hindenburg explosion in Lakehurst, New Jersey, May 6, 1937. (AP Photo) # 

30
Two men inspect the twisted metal framework of the Hindenburg in New Jersey in May of 1937. (AP Photo) # 

31
In New York City, funeral services for the 28 Germans who lost their lives in the Hindenburg disaster are held on the Hamburg-American pier, on May 11, 1937. About 10,000 members of German organizations lined the pier.(AP Photo/Anthony Camerano) # 

32
German soldiers give the salute as they stand beside the casket of Capt. Ernest A. Lehmann, former commander of the zeppelin Hindenburg, during funeral services held on the Hamburg-American pier in New York City, on May 11, 1937. The swastika-draped caskets were placed on board the SS Hamburg for their return to Europe.(AP Photo/Anthony Camerano) # 

33
Surviving members of the crew aboard the ill-fated German zeppelin Hindenburg are photographed at the Naval Air station in Lakehurst, New Jersey, on May 7, 1937. Rudolph Sauter, chief engineer, is at center wearing white cap; behind him is Heinrich Kubis, a steward; Heinrich Bauer, watch officer, is third from right wearing black cap; and 13-year-old Werner Franz, cabin boy, is center front row. Several members of the airship's crew are wearing U.S. Marine summer clothing furnished them to replace clothing burned from many of their bodies as they escaped from the flaming dirigible. (AP Photo) # 

34
An aerial view of the wreckage of the Hindenburg airship near the hangar at the Naval Air station in Lakehurst, New Jersey, on May 7, 1937. (AP Photo/Murray Becker




































Airships


Since the 1850s, engineers have been experimenting with powered lighter-than-air flight, essentially balloons with steering and propulsion. Like other early aeronautical experiments, the trial-and-error period was lengthy and hazardous. Dirigibles (with internal support structures) and blimps (powered balloons) were filled with lifting gases like hydrogen or helium, intended for many uses, from military and research to long-distance passenger service. The growth of the airship suffered numerous setbacks, including the famous Hindenburg disaster in 1937, and never developed into a major mode of travel. Despite the challenges, more than 150 years later, a number of airships are still in use and development around the world as cargo carriers, military platforms, promotional vehicles, and more.
Seventy-Five Years After the Hindenburg
On May 6, 1937, a little over 75 years ago, the most famous of the German airships, the Hindenburg, burst into flames at Lakehurst, New Jersey.
The scene was caught on camera and by radio announcer Herbert Morrison of Radio WLS of Chicago, who famously broke down during his broadcast.
The Hindenburg was the culmination of decades of German engineering and innovation. Man’s first conquest of the air, we often forget, was by hot air balloon and not the Wright Brothers or gliders.

The 'flying bum' goes higher, faster and farther than ever before in latest dusk test flight

  • Sixth test flight in Cardington, Bedfordshire was carried out as night fell
  • Latest series of flights will see Airlander fly up to 7000 feet high, reach speeds of 50 knots and travel 75 miles
  • The firm behind it now hopes to take the ship around the UK in further tests of the craft 

It has been dubbed 'the flying bum' die to its radical design, and the 20-tonne Airlander 10 took a step closer to commercial flying today with its most impressive test yet. 
The flight, in Cardington, Bedfordshire was carried out as night fell, and Airlander was guided into the sky by Chief Test Pilot Dave Burns on her sixth test flight.
The latest test flights will push Airlander to fly higher (up to 7000 feet), faster (up to 50 knots) and further away from its airfield (up to 75 nautical miles away).

Carried out in Cardington, Bedfordshire, the latest series of flights will see Airlander fly up to 7000 feet high, reach speeds of 50 knots and travel 75 miles
Carried out in Cardington, Bedfordshire, the latest series of flights will see Airlander fly up to 7000 feet high, reach speeds of 50 knots and travel 75 miles

HOW THE AIRLANDER GETS ITS LIFT 

Airlander is the largest aircraft in the world, bigger even than the Airbus A380 - but would be dwarfed by the historic zeppelins developed in Germany during the 1930s.
It produces 60 per cent of its lift aerostatically, by being lighter-than-air, and 40 per cent aerodynamically, by being wing-shaped, as well as having the ability to rotate its engines to provide an additional 25 per cent of thrust up or down. 
This means the Airlander can hover as well as land on almost any surface, including ice, desert and water.
It will be able to stay in the air for two weeks at a time, cruising at more than 90mph (144km/h), and travel at heights of up to 20,000ft (6,100 metres) with a 10-tonne cargo. 
'We're thrilled to have commenced the next round of testing; our world class team have really done well and we can't wait to showcase Airlander across the UK in coming months,' said Steve McGlennan, CEO of Hybrid Air Vehicles, the firm behind the craft.
The company hopes the Airlander - which can carry 10 tonnes and up to 60 passengers - will be used for luxury commercial flights over the world's greatest sights from 2019.
'It was a fantastic new flying experience and I am very excited about soon being able to fly on the Airlander around the UK and share some of that thrill with more of the country,' said Andrew Barber, who was on board the Airlander for the very first time today. 
It is soon set to be tested by luxury travel firm Henry Cookson Adventures next year.
It says it hopes to take the craft wherever clients want to go, promising passengers will 'experience landscapes that vary as diversely as the North Pole, Bolivian Salt Pans and Namib Desert'. 
The ability to stay aloft for days at a time, in virtual silence, with floor-to-ceiling windows and fresh air make Airlander perfect for cruising in exceptional locations, Hybrid Air Vehicles, the firm behind it says.
'I have flown Airlander a number of times now, and am really excited about the possibility of taking the first passengers on board. 
The company hopes the Airlander - which can carry 10 tonnes and up to 60 passengers - will be used for luxury commercial flights over the world's greatest sights from 2019.
'I can imagine the awe and excitement of seeing the world in luxury, with amazing views, quietly and whilst respecting the environment,' said Dave Burns, Airlander Chief Test Pilot. 
In 2018, Henry Cookson Adventures (HCA) will become the first private excursion company to trial Airlander 10, anticipating her arrival to revolutionise ultra-high-end travel. 
The craft is set to get a luxury interior as part of the plan, and Hybrid Air Vehicles and Design Q have been awarded a £60,000 grant for an  'Airlander Luxury Tourism Design Development Project'. 
The Airlander 10 is to be tested by luxury travel firm Henry Cookson Adventures next year
Airlander is the largest aircraft in the world, bigger even than the Airbus A380 - but would be dwarfed by the historic zeppelins developed in Germany during the 1930s.
Airlander is the largest aircraft in the world, bigger even than the Airbus A380 - but would be dwarfed by the historic zeppelins developed in Germany during the 1930s.
Design Q is one of the leading independent design consultancies with automotive and aviation clients throughout the world, including BAE Systems, Bombardier and Virgin Atlantic. 
'We are excited with the prospect of working on such a unique project, not only is it the largest flying aircraft in the world but it demands an interior that truly breaks new ground and provides an experience that will be unlike anything seen before,' said Howard Guy, C.E.O and joint founder of Design Q.
'This will be something that passengers will treasure all their lives.'
The Airlander over Glastonbury: Henry Cookson Adventures says it can take the craft anywhere customers want to go
The Airlander over Glastonbury: Henry Cookson Adventures says it can take the craft anywhere customers want to go
The 20-tonne Airlander 10 is set to be tested by luxury travel firm Henry Cookson Adventures next year, and will be fitted with a luxury interior meaning it can stay aloft for weeks at a time. Pictured, the craft over the Grand Canyon
The 20-tonne Airlander 10 is set to be tested by luxury travel firm Henry Cookson Adventures next year, and will be fitted with a luxury interior meaning it can stay aloft for weeks at a time. Pictured, the craft over the Grand Canyon
The world's longest aircraft, dubbed the 'flying bum', took the skies earlier this year for a surprise test flight.
Hundreds of people gathered to watch the 20-tonne Airlander 10 perform aerial manoeuvres in a four-hour flight that took off from Cardington, Bedfordshire.
The 92-yard-long part-airship part-aeroplane was badly damaged when it nosedived during a test flight on 24 August last year.
Hundreds of people gathered to watch the 20-tonne Airlander 10 perform aerial manoeuvres in a four-hour flight that took off from Cardington, Bedfordshire
Hundreds of people gathered to watch the 20-tonne Airlander 10 perform aerial manoeuvres in a four-hour flight that took off from Cardington, Bedfordshire
The 92-yard-long part-airship part-aeroplane was badly damaged when it nosedived during a test flight on 24 August last year
The 92-yard-long part-airship part-aeroplane was badly damaged when it nosedived during a test flight on 24 August last year
Following extensive repairs, it reached the highest altitude so far in its fourth test flight after taking off from hangars at 6.05pm on Tuesday.
A spokesman for its manufacturers Hybrid Air Vehicles said the flight had not been announced to avoid a mass of spectators gathering in the village. 
Passers-by spotted the 38,000 cubic-metre prototype preparing for take-off in Cardington Airfield.
Hundreds of people gathered around the airfield after a local group of 'blimp spotters' also used the weather conditions to predict the test flight.
Roger Skillin, 38, of St Neots, Cambridgeshire, took these incredible photos of the flight after he heard its engine was on.
 Hundreds of people gathered around the airfield after a local group of 'blimp spotters' also used the weather conditions to predict the test flight
 Hundreds of people gathered around the airfield after a local group of 'blimp spotters' also used the weather conditions to predict the test flight
The amateur photographer had wanted to take behind-the-scenes shots of the film sets at the hangar for a new Justice League superhero movie and a Dumbo movie.
He said: 'All the cars just suddenly stopped in the middle of the road.
'I was stood along the edge of the main road looking out to the airfield - just as it was to cross the road there was screeching of brakes and the brake lights going on.
'I think it was just the sheer size of it - you can see it sitting on the ground but you don't really appreciated it until it actually takes off.
'It was maybe 150ft up but considering the size of it it would have been massive and was covering your line of sight.
Airlander 10: the world's largest aircraft and set to turn heads
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The company hoped the Airlander - which can carry 10 tonnes and up to 60 passengers - will be used for luxury commercial flights over the world's greatest sights from 2019
The company hoped the Airlander - which can carry 10 tonnes and up to 60 passengers - will be used for luxury commercial flights over the world's greatest sights from 2019
A spokesman for the company hailed the prototype's test a success after it reached record heights of 3,800ft on the flight
A spokesman for the company hailed the prototype's test a success after it reached record heights of 3,800ft on the flight
It took off at 6.05pm, carried out a series of landing practice runs, reaching speeds of 37 knots. The aircraft can reach heights of 16,000ft and speeds of 80 knots - 93 miles per hour - and fly for up to five days
It took off at 6.05pm, carried out a series of landing practice runs, reaching speeds of 37 knots. The aircraft can reach heights of 16,000ft and speeds of 80 knots - 93 miles per hour - and fly for up to five days
2016: Airlander 10 takes off from British airfield on maiden flight
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'It's like - how can something that big be gracefully moving over you in the sky?
'There's not really anything in nature you can compare it to.'
A spokesman for the company hailed the prototype's test a success after it reached record heights of 3,800ft on the flight.
It took off at 6.05pm, carried out a series of landing practice runs, reaching speeds of 37 knots.
The aircraft can reach heights of 16,000ft and speeds of 80 knots - 93 miles per hour - and fly for up to five days.
The spokesman said plans were going ahead to have more built for commercial flights for between 48 to 60 people over tourists spots such as the Niagara Falls and rivers in Europe.
'Blimp Spotter' Trevor Monk, of local aircraft enthusiast group Cardington Sheds, said: 'There were a few hundred around the airfield.
'It's the longest current aircraft in the world and it's just sitting on an airfield in Bedfordshire but apart from that it's the technology involved - it's a brilliant idea, it's called a hybrid because it's an airship which is an inflated wing.
'It can land on water or a small field that's the beauty of it - it can do a lot of stuff.'  
Cardington hangars enthusiast films Airlander revealed
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The company hopes to have an even bigger aircraft, capable of carrying 50 metric tons (110,000 pounds), in service by the early 2020s
The company hopes to have an even bigger aircraft, capable of carrying 50 metric tons (110,000 pounds), in service by the early 2020s

It did not take long for innovative men to come up with ideas for increasing the lifting power of balloons and for coming up with ways of directing these lighter-than-air craft. German Count Zeppelin actually became these powered flights in 1900, before the Wright Brothers flew at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. His Zeppelin craft did not use motorized power to lift the airships, however, but to direct the airship in flight.
Zeppelin captured the imagination of the new German Empire and also people around the world. Although the count always struggled for money to continue his work, giving rides and received donations from German people helped finance his work (Count Zeppelin relied upon private, not taxpayer, funds to research and develop his incredible airships.) The Hansa carried 24 passengers and mail from Germany to Denmark and Sweden and it flew 399 flights over a period of years until it was requisitioned by the military during the First World War. The Hansa had an outstanding safety record as a commercial airship. Indeed, the German Aviation Association, before the First World War, had flown over 1,600 flights, carrying almost forty thousand passengers without a single death or serious injury.
As Zeppelins develop, the German military became involved and during the First World War, Zeppelins became a long range bombing weapon used primarily for night attacks on London. These attacks achieved much notice but did almost no damage at all to London. The Germans were the first to discover that indiscriminate bombing of civilian populations accomplishes almost nothing militarily and that it is extremely expensive (the RAF discovered the same fact in 1941, when there were more RAF aircrews killed in bombing raids over Germany than Germans killed from British bombs.) The military ineffectiveness of Zeppelin raids had little to do with the highly flammable hydrogen gas. In fact, the combat history of these sorties suggests that it was much harder to burst a Zeppelin into fire than had been generally assumed.
After the war ended, the United States and Britain both tried to develop rigid airships to military purposes. The four American airships —ShenandoahLos AngelesAkron, and Macon — carried several small “Sparrow” biplane fighters. The airships could “launch” and recover the fighters by trapeze. Although the lift was provided by the inert gas Helium, so that these vessels could never burst into flames as the Hindenburg eventually did, all four American airships were disasters. The engineering, much less than the lift gas, was more important.
Although the count had died in 1917, Otto Eckener, a brilliant engineer took over the development of Zeppelins for civilian use. Under his guidance, the Graf Zeppelin, a true passenger airship was developed and entered service. This class of airship flew had a regular and luxurious round trip flight to Brazil and the Graf Zeppelin also flew across the North Atlantic to America, as well as actually circumnavigating the globe. Zeppelins also had regular flights in the Mediterranean and even had an Artic flight over the North Pole. Money for these flights came from passengers, from the sale of air stamps (which were, of course, unique) and from the contributions of large numbers of private citizens.
When the Nazis came to power, they elbowed out the management. Otto Eckener despised National Socialism and although he was kept on the staff, practical control was removed from him. The Nazis sought to use the Zeppelins for propaganda purposes, for peacetime spying (especially upon the Lowlands of Holland and Belgium), and as a potential weapon of war. Much of the history of the Hindenburgrevolves around its use of hydrogen and the inability of the Germans, after the Nazis came to power, to acquire the more expensive, less buoyant but safer Helium, which was almost unavailable outside the Texas Panhandle.
While it is undeniable that the Hindenburg could not have burst into flames 75 years ago in New Jersey if it had been lifted by helium, this does not mean that the Hindenburg would have been safe — the record of virtually all American and British rigid aircraft, which used Helium instead of volatile Hydrogen, was disaster while the Graf Zeppelin class of passenger liners had a safety record much better than most passenger airplanes of the period.
Yet the Hindenburg Disaster, which had a relatively slight death toll, was seen by the world. Airliners would crash with no survivors, but the Hindenburg left most of its passengers and crew alive. What might have happened if the Hindenburg had not burst into flames that fateful day 75 years ago? The creation of a safe and long distance means of travel on hydrogen lifted rigid airships had already been established and the Hindenburg, the biggest of the line, set a standard for comfort and luxury surpassing anything yet achieved on sea or by rail, according to sophisticated world travelers who knew ocean liners and the Orient Express.
Rigid airships, however, traveled much faster, about 80 miles per hour on a dead line, and so could cross the Atlantic Ocean in a couple of days. These vessels were not turbulent at all, and passengers did not record anything like air sickness or sea sickness. Perhaps the most interesting historical consequence of the development of a vast fleet of profitable Hindenburg-class airships might have been the ameliorating influence on German politics. Rigid airships were useless in war but very valuable in peacetime. As common commercial carriers, bigoted discrimination cut deeply into profitability and so, like the Summer Olympics in 1936 caused Nazis to dramatically curtail their anti-Semitism, a successful rigid airship line that brought in desperately needed foreign currency might well have done so too.
The legacy for mankind generally of a commercially safe, fast and comfortable rigid airship line would have given travelers the world over a way to view our world in a way that nothing created since has provided: a calm, clear and beautiful view of oceans, cities and mountains.  Could that happen today? Sadly, it is not even conceivable. The army of trial lawyers, bureaucrats in government regulating every aspect of commerce, and the sensationalist media that must have a crisis to survive, are all militantly against this most graceful and majestic way for people to travel. The Hindenburg disaster deprived mankind forever of something truly wonderful.  

 
The German zeppelin Hindenburg floats past the Empire State Building over Manhattan, on August 8, 1936, en route to Lakehurst, New Jersey, from Germany. (AP Photo) 
 
2
In 1905, pioneering balloonist Thomas Scott Baldwin's latest airship returns from a flight over the City of Portland, Oregon, during the Lewis and Clark Centennial Exposition. (Library of Congress) # 
 
3
An airship flies above the White House in Washington, D.C., in 1906. (George Buck, Library of Congress) # 
 
4
The Baldwin airship at Hammondsport, New York, in 1907. Thomas Scott Baldwin, second from left, was a U.S. Army major during World War I. He became the first American to descend from a balloon by parachute. (Library of Congress) # 
 
5
French military dirigible "Republique" leaving Moisson for Chalais-Mendon, in 1907. (Library of Congress) # 
 
6
Zeppelin airship seen from water, August 4, 1908. (Library of Congress) # 
 
7
A Clement-Bayard dirigible in shed, France, ca 1908. The lobes on the tail, meant for stability, were removed form later models, as they were found to slow the craft in the air. (Library of Congress) # 
 
8
Wellman airship "America" viewed from the RMS TRENT, shown dragging her anchor, ca 1910. (Library of Congress) # 
 
9
Boats, airplane, and airship, ca. 1922. Possibly the U.S. Navy's SCDA O-1. (Library of Congress) # 
 
10
Luftskipet (airship) "Norge" over Ekeberg, Norway, on April 14, 1926. (National Library of Norway) # 
 
11
The giant German dirigible Graf Zeppelin, at Lakehurst, New Jersey, on August 29, 1929. (AP Photo) # 
 
12
The Graf Zeppelin flies low over Tokyo before proceeding to Kasumigaura Airport on its around-the-world flight, on August 19, 1929.(AP Photo) # 
 
13
A pair of Gloster Grebe fighter planes, tethered to the underside of the British Royal Navy airship R33, in October of 1926.(Deutsches Bundesarchiv) # 
 
14
British M.P.s walk onto an airship gangplank, in Cardington, England, in the 1920s. (Library of Congress) # 
 
15
The U.S. Navy's dirigible Los Angeles, upended after a turbulent wind from the Atlantic flipped the 700-foot airship on its nose at Lakehurst, New Jersey, in 1926. The ship slowly righted itself and there were no serious injuries to the crew of 25. (AP Photo) # 
 
16
Aerial view of the USS Akron over Washington, D.C., in 1931, with the long north diagonal of New Jersey Avenue bisected by the balloon and Massachusetts Avenue seen just beneath the ship. (Library of Congress) # 
 
17
Passengers in the dining room of the Hindenburg, in April of 1936. (OFF/AFP/Getty Images) # 
 
18
Interior hull of a U.S. Navy dirigible before gas cells were installed, ca. 1933. (National Archives) # 
 
19
The Graf Zeppelin over the old city of Jerusalem, April 26, 1931. (Library of Congress) # 
 
20
The mechanic of the rear engine gondola changes shift climbing inside the mantle of the airship, as the Graf Zeppelin sails over the Atlantic Ocean in a seven-day journey from Europe to South America, in August of 1933. (AP Photo/Alfred Eisenstaedt) # 
 
21
The German-built zeppelin Hindenburg trundles into the U.S. Navy hangar, its nose hooked to the mobile mooring tower, at Lakehurst, New Jersey, on May 9, 1936. The rigid airship had just set a record for its first north Atlantic crossing, the first leg of ten scheduled round trips between Germany and America. (AP Photo) # 
 
22
The Hindenburg flies over Manhattan, on May 6, 1937. A few hours later, the ship burst into flames in an attempt to land at Lakehurst, New Jersey. (AP Photo) # 
 
23
The German dirigible Hindenburg crashes to earth, tail first, in flaming ruins after exploding at the U.S. Naval Station in Lakehurst, New Jersey, on May 6, 1937. The disaster, which killed 36 people after a 60-hour transatlantic flight from Germany, ended regular passenger service by the lighter-than-air airships. (AP Photo/Murray Becker) # 
 
24
The airship USS Macon, moored at Hangar One at Moffett Federal Airfield near Mountain View, California. (AP Photo/U.S. Navy) # 
 
25
The USS Akron launches a Consolidated N2Y-1 training plane during flight tests near Naval Air Station at Lakehurst, New Jersey, on May 4, 1932. (U.S. Navy) # 
 
26
The USS Los Angeles, moored to the USS Patoka. (San Diego Air and Space Museum Archive) # 
 
27
The wreckage of the naval dirigible USS Akron is brought to the surface of the ocean off the coast of New Jersey, on April 23, 1933. The Akron went down in a violent storm off the New Jersey coast. The disaster claimed 73 lives, more than twice as many as the crash of the Hindenburg. The USS Akron, a 785-foot dirigible, was in its third year of flight when a violent storm sent it crashing tail-first into the Atlantic Ocean shortly after midnight on April 4, 1933. (AP Photo) # 
 
28
Sunset over the Atlantic finds a United Nations convoy moving peacefully towards it destination during World War II. A U.S. Navy blimp, hovering overhead, is on the lookout for any sign of enemy submarines, in June of 1943. (Library of Congress) # 
 
29
The USS Macon sails over lower Manhattan, on October 9, 1933. (AP Photo/U.S. Navy) # 
 
30
At a Nevada nuclear test site test Site, on August 7, 1957, the tail of a U.S. Navy Blimp is photographed with the cloud of a nuclear blast in the background. The Blimp was in temporary free flight in excess of five miles from ground zero when it collapsed from the shock wave of the blast. The airship was unmanned and was used in military effects experiments. Navy personnel on the ground in the vicinity of the experimental area were unhurt. (National Nuclear Security Administration) # 
 
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A small zeppelin airship flies through the air above the men's downhill race of the Alpine skiing World Cup, in Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany, on February 24, 2007. (Timm Schamberger/AFP/Getty Images) # 
 
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Stephane Rousson pedals his airship over the English Channel on September 28, 2008 off Hythe, England. Rousson failed in an earlier attempt to make the 34-mile (55km) journey across the English Chanel in a pedal powered airship. On his second attempt, he made it only halfway before deciding to give up. (Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images) # 
 
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The MetLife blimp soars above the course during the third round of THE PLAYERS Championship in Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida, on May 8, 2010. (Richard Heathcote/Getty Images) # 
 
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Lower Manhattan, viewed at night from the DIRECTV blimp, on September 13, 2009. (Mario Tama/Getty Images) # 
 
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A dog sniffs the airship of French explorer Jean-Louis Etienne, that was to have flown a mission to measure the thickness of north Polar ice, but which was seriously damaged on January 22, 2008, when fierce winds ripped it from its moorings and slammed it into a house in Tourettes, southern France. (AP Photo/Lionel Cironneau) # 
 
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An airship advertising a resort in Dubai passes the London Eye Ferris wheel in London, on November 9, 2006.(Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images) # 
 
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The Long Endurance Multi-Intelligence Vehicle approaches the landing area above Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, New Jersey, during its first flight, on August 7, 2012. The LEMV is intended to provide sensors capable of persistent intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance in a forward combat environment. (U.S. Army/Jim Kendall) # 
 
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Bradley Hasemeyer uses his smartphone to photograph the Aeroscraft airship, a high-tech prototype airship, outside a World War II-era hangar in Tustin, California, on January 24, 2013. Work is almost done on the 230-foot rigid airship prototype inside the blimp hangar in Orange County. The huge cargo-carrying airship has shiny aluminum skin and a rigid, 230-foot aluminum and carbon fiber skeleton. The prototype is half the size of the planned full-scale version, which will be designed to carry up to 250 tons of cargo.(AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)

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