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Tuesday, December 5, 2017






US Defensive Weapons 


The top secret MICROWAVE missile that can take out North Korea's nukes before all-out US assault
  • CHAMP weapons use powerful microwave pulses to knock out electronics
  • White House believes missiles could play a role in fighting North Korea
  • Weapon could stop Kim Jong-un firing rockets by taking out control centers
  • Comes after dictator tested Hwasong-15 missile which can range the whole US 
The White House has discussed using experimental microwave missiles against North Korea to disable Kim Jong-un's nukes, it has been reported.
In the event of a war with the dictator the Air Force could use CHAMP weapons to fry the electronics controlling Kim's latest rockets, stopping them from being launched.
The use of such weapons, which are not yet operational, was discussed at a White House meeting on North Korea back in August.
The White House has discussed using experimental CHAMP weapons, which use powerful microwave beams to knock out enemy electronics, in a war against North Korea
The White House has discussed using experimental CHAMP weapons, which use powerful microwave beams to knock out enemy electronics, in a war against North Korea
It is hoped the weapons could stop Kim Jong-un from being able to launch nuclear weapons by frying their circuits and knocking out the control center
It is hoped the weapons could stop Kim Jong-un from being able to launch nuclear weapons by frying their circuits and knocking out the control center
CHAMP stands for counter-electronics high-power advanced microwave project and was started by the Air Force Research Laboratory back in 2009.
In 2012 one of the weapons was tested in Utah against electronic equipment that was set up to mirror the capabilities of Iran and North Korea.
The weapon managed to wipe out everything inside the first building it targeted, including the camera recording the test, before going on to target five more buildings then crashing itself at a pre-determined site.
This is the only test of a microwave weapon to have been declassified. 
Other tests are believed to have taken place since then to improve the weapon, including mounting it on a missile that is harder to detect and upping the power.
It comes after Kim tested the Hwasong-15 ICBM which is likely capable of ranging the whole US and can carry a 'super heavy nuclear warhead', according to the hermit state
It comes after Kim tested the Hwasong-15 ICBM which is likely capable of ranging the whole US and can carry a 'super heavy nuclear warhead', according to the hermit state
The launch prompted the US and South Korea air force to stage their largest ever joint drills in a show of force to Pyongyang
The launch prompted the US and South Korea air force to stage their largest ever joint drills in a show of force to Pyongyang
A 2016 Air Force Research Laboratory document, seen by NBC, says the low-flying missile is 'capable of flying into a contested area and disabling an adversary's electronic systems.'
The news comes days after Kim tested North Korea's latest ICBM, the Hwasong-15, which is likely capable of ranging all of mainland America.
North Korea claims the missile is capable of carrying a 'super heavy nuclear warhead' and can bring it down to Earth intact, though has not shown evidence of this.
That test has been followed by the largest joint air drills ever conducted by the US and South Korean air forces in a show of power to Kim Jong-un.
China has announced it held its own drills involving reconnaissance planes, fighter jets, and an early warning and control aircraft.
Beijing said the drill was designed as a show of force to Washington and Seoul, though did not not say exactly when or where the exercise took place. 

US bomber takes part in huge warplane exercise over South Korea as a warning of the 'strong intent to punish North Korea when threatened with nuclear missiles'

  • The Guam-based B-1B supersonic bomber simulated strikes at a military field near South Korea's east coast 
  • The drill, a joint exercise with South Korean and US fighter jets, came after North Korea tested an ICBM
  • Hwasong-15 that North Korea tested last week has the potential to strike targets as far as Washington, DC
The United States flew a B-1B supersonic bomber over South Korea on Wednesday as part of a massive combined aerial exercise involving hundreds of warplanes, a clear warning aimed at North Korea after it tested its biggest and most powerful missile yet.
South Korea's Joint Chiefs of Staff said the Guam-based bomber simulated land strikes at a military field near South Korea's eastern coast during a drill with US and South Korean fighter jets.
'Through the drill, the South Korean and US air forces displayed the allies' strong intent and ability to punish North Korea when threatened by nuclear weapons and missiles,' the military said in a statement.
US flies B-1B supersonic bomber aircraft over South Korea
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The United States flew a B-1B supersonic bomber (left) over South Korea on Wednesday in part of a massive combined aerial exercise involving hundreds of warplanes, a clear warning after North Korea last week tested its biggest and most powerful missile yet
The United States flew a B-1B supersonic bomber (left) over South Korea on Wednesday in part of a massive combined aerial exercise involving hundreds of warplanes, a clear warning after North Korea last week tested its biggest and most powerful missile yet
South Korea's Joint Chiefs of Staff said the Guam-based bomber simulated land strikes at a military field near South Korea's eastern coast during a drill with US and South Korean fighter jets
South Korea's Joint Chiefs of Staff said the Guam-based bomber simulated land strikes at a military field near South Korea's eastern coast during a drill with US and South Korean fighter jets
B-1Bs flyovers have become an increasingly familiar show of force to North Korea, which after three intercontinental ballistic missile tests has clearly moved closer toward building a nuclear arsenal that could viably target the US mainland
B-1Bs flyovers have become an increasingly familiar show of force to North Korea, which after three intercontinental ballistic missile tests has clearly moved closer toward building a nuclear arsenal that could viably target the US mainland
The five-day drills in South Korea, which began on Monday, involve more than 200 aircraft, including six US F-22 and 18 F-35 stealth fighters
The five-day drills in South Korea, which began on Monday, involve more than 200 aircraft, including six US F-22 and 18 F-35 stealth fighters
B-1Bs flyovers have become an increasingly familiar show of force to North Korea, which after three intercontinental ballistic missile tests has clearly moved closer toward building a nuclear arsenal that could viably target the US mainland.
The five-day drills that began Monday involve more than 200 aircraft, including six US F-22 and 18 F-35 stealth fighters.
North Korea hates such displays of American military might at close range and claimed through its state media on Tuesday that the 'US imperialist war mongers' extremely reckless war hysteria' has put the region at risk of a nuclear war.
The North continued to describe the B-1B a 'nuclear strategic bomber' although the plane was switched to conventional weaponry in the mid-1990s.
North Korea typically uses strong language when commenting on US-South Korean war games, which it claims are invasion rehearsals. North Korea hates such displays of American military might at close range and claimed through its state media on Tuesday that the 'US imperialist war mongers' extremely reckless war hysteria' has put the region at risk of a nuclear war. Pictured above, a US Air Force B-1B Lancer bomber (center), two US F-35A and two US F-35B stealth jets (top) flying over South Korea with South Korea's two F-16 and two F-15K fighter jets (bottom) during a joint military drill.
North Korea hates such displays of American military might at close range and claimed through its state media on Tuesday that the 'US imperialist war mongers' extremely reckless war hysteria' has put the region at risk of a nuclear war. Pictured above, a US Air Force B-1B Lancer bomber (center), two US F-35A and two US F-35B stealth jets (top) flying over South Korea with South Korea's two F-16 and two F-15K fighter jets (bottom) during a joint military drill.
The North, its leader Kim Jong-un pictured above centre, continued to describe the B-1B a 'nuclear strategic bomber' although the plane was switched to conventional weaponry in the mid-1990s
The North, its leader Kim Jong-un pictured above centre, continued to describe the B-1B a 'nuclear strategic bomber' although the plane was switched to conventional weaponry in the mid-1990s
South Korean President Moon Jae-In will visit China next week for talks on North Korea and other issues, his office said on Wednesday, amid tentative signs of diplomatic movement after months of high tensions over Pyongyang's nuclear and missile threats
South Korean President Moon Jae-In will visit China next week for talks on North Korea and other issues, his office said on Wednesday, amid tentative signs of diplomatic movement after months of high tensions over Pyongyang's nuclear and missile threats
Still, perennially bad tensions are at a particularly dangerous point with North Korea rapidly advancing its nuclear weapons program.
South Korea's military says the Hwasong-15 the North tested last week has the potential to strike targets as far away as 13,000 kilometers (8,100 miles), which would put Washington within reach. 
The test flight used an arched trajectory and the missile flew 950 kilometers (600 miles) before splashing down near Japan.
The North also tested a different intercontinental ballistic missile twice in July and conducted its most powerful nuclear test in September which it described as a detonation of a thermonuclear weapon designed for ICBMs. 
South Korean President Moon Jae-In will visit China next week for talks on North Korea and other issues, his office said on Wednesday, amid tentative signs of diplomatic movement after months of high tensions over Pyongyang's nuclear and missile threats.
The announcement came as a high-level United Nations representative held talks with a senior North Korean official during a rare trip to Pyongyang. 
U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcons and F-35 Lightning IIs participate in a training mission near Kunsan Air Base in preparation for VIGILANT ACE 18 in South Korea
U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcons and F-35 Lightning IIs participate in a training mission near Kunsan Air Base in preparation for VIGILANT ACE 18 in South Korea
The UN's International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) in October condemned the North's continued unannounced missile launches, urging it to comply with international aviation standards to prevent risks. Pictured above, US Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcon and F-35 Lightning II aircraft participate in a training mission near Kunsan Air Base, South Korea in preparation for VIGILANT ACE 18 in South Korea
The UN's International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) in October condemned the North's continued unannounced missile launches, urging it to comply with international aviation standards to prevent risks. Pictured above, US Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcon and F-35 Lightning II aircraft participate in a training mission near Kunsan Air Base, South Korea in preparation for VIGILANT ACE 18 in South Korea
Discussing ways to 'peacefully resolve North Korea's nuclear issue' will be on Moon's agenda when he meets President Xi Jinping next week, Moon's office said. Pictured above, a US Air Force F-35A Lightning II assigned to Hill Air Force Base, Utah, conducts a training flight with F-16 Fighting Falcons assigned to Kunsan Air Base, South Korea over the city of Gunsan, in South Korea
Discussing ways to 'peacefully resolve North Korea's nuclear issue' will be on Moon's agenda when he meets President Xi Jinping next week, Moon's office said. Pictured above, a US Air Force F-35A Lightning II assigned to Hill Air Force Base, Utah, conducts a training flight with F-16 Fighting Falcons assigned to Kunsan Air Base, South Korea over the city of Gunsan, in South Korea
Jeffrey Feltman, UN undersecretary general for political affairs, arrived Tuesday to discuss 'issues of mutual interest and concern'.
It was not immediately clear what was discussed between Feltman and the North's vice foreign minister Pak Myong-Kuk. 
Discussing ways to 'peacefully resolve North Korea's nuclear issue' will be on Moon's agenda when he meets President Xi Jinping next week, Moon's office said.
China has proposed that the North suspend missile and nuclear tests in exchange for a suspension of US-South Korean military exercises, a suggestion Washington has repeatedly rejected.
North Korea stopped giving advance notice of its missile tests in 2014.
The UN's International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) in October condemned the North's continued unannounced missile launches, urging it to comply with international aviation standards to preve

The Pukkuksong submarine-launched ballistic missiles (SLBM) were on parade. It was the first time North Korea had shown the missiles, which have a range of more than 1,000 km (600 miles), at a military parade.

Displaying more than one of the missiles indicates North Korea is progressing with its plan to base a missile on a submarine, which are hard to detect, said Joshua Pollack, editor of the Washington-based Nonproliferation Review.

"It suggests a commitment to this program," said Pollack. "Multiple SLBMs seems like a declaration of intent to advance the program."

North Korea, still technically at war with the South after their 1950-53 conflict ended in a truce but not a treaty, has on occasion conducted missile or nuclear tests to coincide with big political events and often threatens the United States, South Korea and Japan.

Choe Ryong Hae, a close aide to Kim Jong Un, addressed the packed square with a characteristically bellicose warning to the United States.

"If the United States wages reckless provocation against us, our revolutionary power will instantly counter with annihilating strike, and we will respond to full-out war with full-out war and to nuclear war with our style of nuclear strike warfare," he said.


Pictured: US conducts successful rocket intercept test after North Korea revealed 'nuclear missile which could reach Alaska'

  • US tested Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) system off Alaska coast
  • It intercepts and destroys short, medium, intermediate range ballistic missiles
  • Comes after North Korea tested ballistic rocket it claims can reach the US coast 
  • US military says high-tech defensive systems can fend off North Korean attack



The US military has successfully tested a missile intercept system amid tensions with North Korea, which is said to have a ballistic missile capable of reaching Alaska. 
In the US test launch, a Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) system targeted a ballistic missile launched mid-air from an Air Force C-17 transport aircraft over the Pacific Ocean.
'A THAAD weapon system located in Kodiak, Alaska, detected, tracked and intercepted the target,' a US Missile Defense Agency said in a statement.
The system is designed to intercept and destroy short, medium and intermediate range ballistic missiles during the final phase of their flight.
Scroll down for video 
A Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) interceptor is launched from the Pacific Spaceport Complex Alaska during Flight Test THAAD (FTT)-18  in Kodiak, Alaska, on July 11
A Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) interceptor is launched from the Pacific Spaceport Complex Alaska during Flight Test THAAD (FTT)-18 in Kodiak, Alaska, on July 11
The Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) weapon system intercepts a threat-representative intermediate-range ballistic missile (IRBM) target during Flight Test THAAD (FTT)-18 on July 11
The Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) weapon system intercepts a threat-representative intermediate-range ballistic missile (IRBM) target during Flight Test THAAD (FTT)-18 on July 11
This photo on July 4, 2017, distributed by the North Korean government shows what was said to be the launch of a Hwasong-14 intercontinental ballistic missile, ICBM, in North Korea's northwest
This photo on July 4, 2017, distributed by the North Korean government shows what was said to be the launch of a Hwasong-14 intercontinental ballistic missile, ICBM, in North Korea's northwest
This graphic shows what the trajectory of the Hwasong-14 intercontinental ballistic missile would take, with some experts saying the North Korean rocket could reach Alaska
This graphic shows what the trajectory of the Hwasong-14 intercontinental ballistic missile would take, with some experts saying the North Korean rocket could reach Alaska

The U.S. successfully launches a THAAD interceptor




 
 
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Though such exercises are planned months in advance, this one comes after North Korea test-fired an intercontinental ballistic missile it claims is capable of reaching parts of the United States for the very first time.
Although the rocket came crashing down in the Sea of Japan, it had a probable range of over 5,500km (3,400 miles) - enough to reach Alaskan shores.
The US military said it has faith its high-tech defensive systems could fend off any attack from North Korea.
'It's something we have confidence in,' said Pentagon spokesman Navy Captain Jeff Davis, who called the latest development a 'nascent threat'.
Meanwhile, Kim Jong-un has warned US President Donald Trump he was pushing his nation to the  brink of nuclear war after the US and South Korea conducted a live-fire exercise on the peninsula. 
This tweet, re-tweeted by President Trump, announced that the US was 'flexing its muscles' by conducting a successful missile intercept test off the coast of Alaska
This tweet, re-tweeted by President Trump, announced that the US was 'flexing its muscles' by conducting a successful missile intercept test off the coast of Alaska
The US intercept test comes after North Korea fired an intercontinental ballistic missile capable of reaching parts of the United States for the very first time Pictured: Kim Jong-Un celebrating the first successful test launch on July 4
The US intercept test comes after North Korea fired an intercontinental ballistic missile capable of reaching parts of the United States for the very first time Pictured: Kim Jong-Un celebrating the first successful test launch on July 4
A U.S. missile defense system called Terminal High Altitude Area Defense, or THAAD, is seen at a golf course in Seongju, South Korea, Tuesday, July 4 
A U.S. missile defense system called Terminal High Altitude Area Defense, or THAAD, is seen at a golf course in Seongju, South Korea, Tuesday, July 4 
North Korea tests first missile capable of hitting United States

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The North's state-run Rodong newspaper accused Washington and Seoul of ratcheting up tensions with the drill - a response to the North's missile launch - in an editorial titled 'Don't play with fire on a powder keg'.
'The US, with its dangerous military provocation, is pushing the risk of a nuclear war on the peninsula to a tipping point,' it said, describing the peninsula as the 'world's biggest tinderbox'.
The US military this year began deploying THAAD to South Korea, a move that infuriated China, which has argued the deployment would further destabilize the situation on the Korean peninsula.
This was the 14th successful intercept in 14 attempts for the THAAD weapon system, the Missile Defense Agency (MDA) said.
'I couldn't be more proud of the government and contractor team who executed this flight test today,' MDA Director Lieutenant General Sam Greaves said in the statement.
The US military this year began deploying THAAD to South Korea, a move that infuriated China. Pictured: North Korea's intercontinental ballistic missile before it was launched
The US military this year began deploying THAAD to South Korea, a move that infuriated China. Pictured: North Korea's intercontinental ballistic missile before it was launched
'This test further demonstrates the capabilities of the THAAD weapon system and its ability to intercept and destroy ballistic missile threats. 
'THAAD continues to protect our citizens, deployed forces and allies from a real and growing threat.'
THAAD uses 'hit-to-kill' technology where kinetic energy from the interceptor missile destroys an incoming target.

A new report, created by UN experts, suggests that North Korea has almost completed work on its advanced submarine missile program
A new report, created by UN experts, suggests that North Korea has almost completed work on its advanced submarine missile program
In December, satellite images of the Sinpo South Shipyard sparked speculation that a weapon could be launched imminently
In December, satellite images of the Sinpo South Shipyard sparked speculation that a weapon could be launched imminently





Story highlights
  • US tracked North Korean missile with Aegis ballistic missile defense, Pentagon says
  • US, Japan, South Korea operate Aegis-equipped warships
(CNN)North Korea's test of a ballistic missile last month showed new, more dangerous capabilities in its missile program, but the Pentagon says the US and its Asian allies have defenses to deal with threat.
When North Korea launched the missile on February 12, the US Navy had two destroyers in the Sea of Japan with the ability to shoot it down, a US defense official said.
The guided missile destroyers, USS Stethem and USS McCampbell, are equipped with the Aegis ballistic missile defense system, which is able to track 100 missiles simultaneously and fire interceptors to take out an enemy's ballistic projectiles.
    The Aegis-equipped guided-missile destroyer USS Stethem sails in formation as part of an exercise off South Korea in 2016.
    "We worked very quickly with our Japanese and South Korean allies to make sure that it did not pose a threat to them either. As you know we maintain abilities to be able to respond quickly and intercept missiles from North Korea if they do pose a threat to us or our allies," a Pentagon spokesman, US Navy Capt. Jeff Davis, said.
    The North Korean launch involved the first land-based test of an intermediate-range missile that, in the past, has been fired from a submarine, two US officials said.
    And because it was launched from a missile site on North Korea's west coast, it flew farther than any previous North Korean tests, about 300 miles before dropping into the Sea of Japan.
    A South Korean lawmaker's office said the North Korean missile could have gone even farther.
    "The missile was launched at 89 degrees, and if it were to be launched at normal angle, which is 45 degrees, it could fly over 2,000 kilometers (1,242 miles). This launch shows that North Korea's missile technology is constantly progressing," said a statement from the office of Lee Cheol-woo, who was briefed by South Korea's National Intelligence Service.
    US officials noted that the missile, the Pukguksong-2, used solid rocket fuel, making it harder to detect an imminent launch because it requires less fueling time on the launch pad.
    But the Aegis system, which is in the arsenals of the US, Japan and South Korea, enables early detection of missile threats and provides the ability to track those missiles for interception later in their flights, according to Lockheed Martin, the prime contractor behind the system.
    "The Aegis system is very capable at tracking and engaging ballistic missile systems," said Carl Schuster, a Hawaii Pacific University professor and former director of operations at the US Pacific Command's Joint Intelligence Center.
    Ballistic missiles use a high, arching trajectory to reach their targets. Aegis, using powerful AN/SPY-1 radar on warships nearest the launch site, picks up the missiles during their ascent phase.
    Those nearby ships can fire interceptors to strike the ballistic missile early in its flight, or send tracking data to ships farther along the ballistic missile's flight path, so it can be destroyed when it is near its highest point.
    President Donald Trump's pivot on Asia 03:00
    Aegis does have the ability to link data between US, Japanese and South Korean warships, Schuster said. But it has limitations, too.
    While the US system can work with either Japan or South Korea, the three cannot work together because there is no one data encryption system that works among them, Schuster said.
    And Bruce Bennett, senior defense analyst with the Rand Corporation, says the South Korean Aegis destroyers are not equipped with the interceptors necessary to take out enemy ballistic missiles.
    Aegis can also work with other missile defense systems -- such as the Terminal High Altitude Area Defense, or THAAD, which is to be deployed in South Korea this year, or the Patriot missile defense.
    But those systems have a more limited range, elevating the importance of Aegis ships, where they are, and how often they are deployed.
    "I think the US needs to position its Aegis ships in the right part of the Sea of Japan to intercept a North Korean missile test and that the US Navy has not been doing that on a regular basis," Bennett said.
    While Aegis has been successful in intercepting ballistic missiles during tests, it has not been used to take out one in combat.
    In what some say is the system's most noteworthy success, Aegis was used to destroy an inoperable spy satellite in 2008 when officials feared the satellite could crash to Earth and potentially release a cloud of toxic gas.
    The US Navy has 22 guided-missile cruisers and 62 guided-missile destroyers equipped with the Aegis system. Japan has six Aegis destroyers with plans for more. South Korea operates three Aegis-equipped destroyers.






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